Stuff to read

(and to listen to!)

Here are links to reading material, relevant to our Climate Breakdown Shakedown discussions … and to recordings of the sessions

TO LISTEN TO

16 December session. Talk by Ted Benton on biodiversity (audio)

21 October session. Talk by Greg Muttitt on subsidies for oil companies (audio)

TO READ

21 October session. UK Climate policy and how we can change it, with Greg Muttitt (Oil Change International) and Samantha Mason (PCS, the civil service trade union)

This is the report that Greg’s talk was partly based on: Sea Change: Climate Emergency, Jobs and Managing the Phase-Out of UK Oil and Gas Extraction. Published by Oil Change International, Platform and Friends of the Earth Scotland

Plus, Greg says in an email: “Some of the studies that came up in discussion, such as McCollum’s study on investment needs, or Grubler’s, CAT’s, Teske’s and others’ models of decarbonisation, are referenced in the Sea Change report. If there are any requests for specific follow-up, I’d be happy to oblige.”

This is a report that Sam wrote, and which she mentioned in her talk: Just Transition and Energy Democracy: a civil service trade union perspective

She also recommends this presentation by Trade Unions for Energy Democracy: The Green New Deal, the Challenge of Decarbonization, and the Crucial Role of Public Ownership

At the session, I mentioned the campaign work by Neil Rothnie, a retired oil worker and active participant in Extinction Rebellion Scotland. In these articles, he calls for a just transition away from the oil-based economy: North Sea oil and gas: the elephant in the room and XR call for just transition from North Sea oil to renewable energy. I also recommend the web site of Scot.E3, a group of trade unionists in Scotland: “E3” is for “employment, energy and environment”.

30 September session. Fossil fuel use and how to stop it, with Simon Pirani (author, Burning Up: A Global History of Fossil Fuel Consumption) and Dario Kenner (author, Carbon Inequality).

Dario’s web site, Why Green Economy?, features the “polluter elite” database, that highlights some of those most responsible for excessive greenhouse gas emissions.

Simon’s videos, podcasts and presentations are on his web site here.

Here are links to reading material, relevant to our discussions

21 October session. UK Climate policy and how we can change it, with Greg Muttitt (Oil Change International) and Samantha Mason (PCS, the civil service trade union)

This is the report that Greg’s talk was partly based on: Sea Change: Climate Emergency, Jobs and Managing the Phase-Out of UK Oil and Gas Extraction. Published by Oil Change International, Platform and Friends of the Earth Scotland

Plus, Greg says in an email: “Some of the studies that came up in discussion, such as McCollum’s study on investment needs, or Grubler’s, CAT’s, Teske’s and others’ models of decarbonisation, are referenced in the Sea Change report. If there are any requests for specific follow-up, I’d be happy to oblige.”

This is a report that Sam wrote, and which she mentioned in her talk: Just Transition and Energy Democracy: a civil service trade union perspective

She also recommends this presentation by Trade Unions for Energy Democracy: The Green New Deal, the Challenge of Decarbonization, and the Crucial Role of Public Ownership

At the session, I mentioned the campaign work by Neil Rothnie, a retired oil worker and active participant in Extinction Rebellion Scotland. In these articles, he calls for a just transition away from the oil-based economy: North Sea oil and gas: the elephant in the room and XR call for just transition from North Sea oil to renewable energy. I also recommend the web site of Scot.E3, a group of trade unionists in Scotland: “E3” is for “employment, energy and environment”.

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30 September session. Fossil fuel use and how to stop it, with Simon Pirani (author, Burning Up: A Global History of Fossil Fuel Consumption) and Dario Kenner (author, Carbon Inequality).

Dario’s web site, Why Green Economy?, features the “polluter elite” database, that highlights some of those most responsible for excessive greenhouse gas emissions.

Simon’s videos, podcasts and presentations are on his web site here.

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